Best Tactical Tomahawk

Tomahawks are great tools for many purposes – bushcrafting, self-defense, axe throwing competitions, even for hunting and in emergency situations. Tactical tomahawks take the traditional wood-handled tomahawk design and take it to the next level – more durable and sometimes with more features – such as a pick or hammer on the back or poll side of the axehead. Some even have a crowbar at the end of the handle. So read on to find out what I consider to be the best tactical tomahawks for the money on the market.

Top 7 Tactical Tomahawks

SOG Tactical Tomahawk Throwing Axe

  • 12.5 inches
  • 2 inch cutting edge
  • 19 ounces
  • Ballistic nylon sheath
  • Checked hammering surface
  • Poll spike
  • 420 stainless steel
  • Glass-reinforced nylon handle

The SOG Tactical Tomahawk is one of the most popular models out there, and for good reason. It’s light, sharp, with a sleek design and solid construction. It’s also multi-functional – apart from the axe edge itself, it has a spiked poll end and a checked hammering surface on the side of the axehead.

The straight cutting edge is 2 inches long, more than enough to penetrate into whatever you throw it at and also usable for cutting small saplings and branches. It’s marketed as a throwing axe, which is what tomahawks are, but the hammering surface on the side of the axehead is useful when out camping for hammering tent stakes into the ground. The poll spike can be used for breaking up ice or earth. The axe can, of course, be used for self-defense against aggressive animals.

Finally, the SOG Tactical Tomahawk comes with a ballistic nylon sheath, which is a useful accessory for keeping the axe from cutting through anything in your bag or accidentally nicking you.

Overall this is a great tactical tomahawk, good value for money combined with solid construction. Highly recommended. 

Estwing Black Eagle Tactical Tomahawk

  • 16 inch handle
  • 3 inch cutting edge
  • 27 ounces (1.68 lbs)
  • Heavy-duty nylon sheath
  • Poll spike
  • Full tang design
  • 1055 carbon steel
  • Patented shock reduction handle

The Estwing Black Eagle Tomahawk is an excellent tool that is made in the heart of the USA – Rockford, Illinois, using American-made 1055 carbon steel. Estwing are one of the few companies to still make their axes in the USA, and they have a reputation for ensuring high quality at a surprisingly affordable price. The Estwing Tomahawk has a 16 inch handle and 3 inch cutting edge and is forged in one piece, making it virtually indestructible. It comes with Estwing’s patented shock reduction grip, which reduces vibrations from strikes and which is something you want to have with full-tang axes (believe me, your wrists and arm joints will thank you). This tactical tomahawk is primarily a self-defense or breaching tool – getting into or out of a car, for example, or defending yourself from animal (or human) threats to your life.

You can also get it in different colors and with a lacquered leather handle, but the Black Eagle is my choice as a top tactical tomahawk. Highly recommended.

HX Outdoors Multifunctional Tactical Tomahawk

  • Full tang
  • Leather sheath
  • Stainless steel 440C
  • Prybar handle end
  • Hammer poll

The HX Outdoors Multifunctional Tactical Tomahawk is a multi-purpose tool. It is a full-tang tomahawk-type axe, but it also has a prybar at the end of the handle and a hammer face on the poll. This is a good truck/vehicle axe to keep in the front in case you need to escape your vehicle or help get someone else out of theirs. As it is full-tang, it is practically indestructible 440C stainless steel. It comes with a leather sheath.

Smith and Wesson Full Tang Tactical Tomahawk

  • 420 Stainless steel
  • Full tang
  • Poll spike
  • 16.5 inch overall length
  • 2.5 lbs weight
  • Hard rubber handle
  • Nylon sheath

The Smith and Wesson Tactical Tomahawk is another full-tang axe with a very sleek design. It’s a simple tactical tomahawk, but it does what it’s supposed to do very well. 16.5 inches in overall length and 2.5 pounds in weight, the S&W has a hard rubber handle, curved cutting edge, and poll spike. Comes with a nylon sheath.

CRKT Kangee Tactical Tomahawk

  • Full tang construction
  • SK5 carbon steel
  • 3 inch cutting edge
  • 13.75 inch length
  • 1.53 lbs
  • Glass-reinforced nylon handle
  • Powder coated

The CRKT Kangee tomahawk is an excellent little axe that is both light and durable, as it is a full-tang construction (handle and axehead are forged together). The Kangee is 13.75 inches long, has a 3-inch cutting edge, and weighs just over 1.5 pounds – not bad for a metal tomahawk. Its reinforced nylon handle, with the “ribbed” design, gives you a good grip on the hawk. Holes at the bottom of the handle allow for paracord to be threaded through. The SK5 steel holds an edge very well, although it is slightly more brittle than tool-grade steel (SK5 is knife-grade steel). The upside is that it is easy to sharpen. As many good tactical tomahawks do, the Kangee also has a spike on the reverse side of the axehead. 

Milletech Tactical Tomahawk/Survival Multi-Tool

  • includes Knife, Hammer, Flint, Whistle, Safety Hammer, Compass, Extension Bars, Sheath
  • Extension bars and thick aluminum alloy handle
  • 17 inch handle
  • 2.2 lbs weight

The Milletech Tactical Tomahawk is a jack-of-all trades in that it everything you need to survive can be found within its handle. Not only is it a 17-inch tactical tomahawk, it is designed so that the handle can be screwed apart to access a knife, flint, whistle, compass, and hammerm, as well as two extension bars. Each element can be screwed together with an extension bar for independent use. The best thing? The whole thing only weighs 2.2 lbs. A good choice if you’re looking for an all-in-one survival tool within a tactical tomahawk (which also has a hammer poll). 

CRKT Chogan Tomahawk – Best Traditional Tomahawk

  • Tennessee hickory wood handle (easy to replace)
  • 3.5 inch blade
  • 19 inch overall length
  • 1.9 lbs weight
  • 1055 carbon steel
  • Hammerhead poll

The CRKT Chogan tactical tomahawk is a more traditional design – with a wooden handle. However, this makes it easy to rehandle in case of handle breakage. It has a 3.5 inch cutting edge, is 19 inches in overall length, and 1.9 lbs in weight. The axehead and cutting edge are 1055 medium-high carbon steel, so you can get it very sharp. Finally, the axehead also has a hammerhead poll, for driving stakes and, for example, tenderizing freshly-caught meat out in that bush. Designed by Ryan Johnson of RMJ Tactical in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Tactical Tomahawk History

Tomahawks are a Native American tool. At first just stone axeheads attached to a handle with strips of leather, they were adopted by European settlers. In the American War of Independence, men serving in the revolutionary forces were required to carry either a tomahawk or a sword as a backup weapon for close combat. The tactical tomahawk became popular in another war, except this time it was across the world – in the jungles and rice paddies of Vietnam.

A World War 2 veteran of Mohawk descent, Peter LeGana, founded the American Tomahawk Company. He supplied GIs and other military men in Vietnam with mail-order tactical tomahawks. These were simple designs – a wooden handle, painted forest green, with an attached axehead. The axehead had the cutting edge, but it also had a sharp spike on the poll side. These tomahawks were usable both as field tools – for chopping through dense bush, for example – but also, undoubtedly, as weapons to eliminate the enemy with. These tomahawks were popular among special operators, who would use them for quick, silent, but very lethal takedowns.

In more modern days, tactical tomahawks have been seen from Iraq to Afghanistan. They’re tougher now, often full tang and with fiberglass handles to reduce the chance of breakage. These tactical tomahawks can be used as breaching tools, to break windows or locks on doors, and the spike can be used to penetrate through Kevlar armor (such as a helmet). They’re not widely used, of course, and are often more of a novelty item, but there’s a reason why small axes have been a melee weapon of choice for hundreds and even thousands of years. The design works, and is deadly.